Island Treasures!

The Jekyll Island Authority (JIA) hosts “Island Treasures on Jekyll Island,” a unique treasure hunting experience on Georgia’s most popular public beach. The treasures are hand-crafted glass floats, called Island Treasures. The glass floats have been sought after by Jekyll Island guests since 2002. Each is unique and stamped with the year to be a collector’s item for the lucky beachcomber who finds one.

January 1 – February 28, 2013:

Island Treasures mimic glass floats once used on the fishing nets of fishermen in the early 1900s. The floats would sometimes break loose and wash ashore for lucky beachcombers to find and keep. Collecting these glass floats became a hobby in the 1950’s, but it declined as commercial fishing moved to plastic and Styrofoam floats. Glass fishing floats became rare and are highly sought after and very valuable today.

During these first two winter months, the Jekyll Island Authority recreates this hunt-and-find experience. The glass float treasures are the works of commissioned artists from across the country. “Beach Buddies” hide them along the shore line every day for lucky visitors to find and keep. Treasure finders can register their Island Treasure at the Jekyll Island Visitor Information Center to receive a bio on the artist and a certificate of authenticity. The Jekyll Island Visitor Information Center has Island Treasure floats and an array of the other colorful glass creations for purchase in-store. (912) 635-3636



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